An idea can be communicated better with a drawing… Even a passable sketch dramatically helps crystallize an idea.

So, if you can’t draw, make it a daily project and learn.

It will not only make you a profoundly better communicator of your idea, it will add more joy to the way you see.

From “DAMN GOOD ADVICE – How To Unleash Your Creative Potential”, a book by George Lois (1931-), veteran American art director, designer and ad man.

Reject analysis paralysis.

Get the Big Idea, think it through – if it all fits, you know it’s right…

Do not analyze it. Trust your gut. Trust your instincts.

From “DAMN GOOD ADVICE – How To Unleash Your Creative Potential”, a book by George Lois (1931-), veteran American art director, designer and ad man.

(Salvador Dali’s) favorite technique is that he would put a tin plate on the floor and then sit by a chair beside it, holding a spoon over the plate.

He would then totally relax his body; sometimes he would begin to fall asleep. The moment that he began to doze the spoon would slip from his fingers and clang on the plate, immediately waking him to capture the surreal images.

From a post on www.creativitypost.com called “Salvador Dali’s Creative Thinking Technique” describing “How to conjure up dreamlike imagery from your subconscious”

The best ideas come as jokes. Make your thinking as funny as possible.

From David Ogilvy (1911-1999), British ad executive, widely hailed as “the father of advertising”.

All creativity should communicate in a nanosecond.

… if you can’t express your thinking concisely and surprisingly – and communicate it visually in a nanosecond – it’s not a Big Idea.

From “DAMN GOOD ADVICE – How To Unleash Your Creative Potential”, a book by George Lois (1931-), veteran American art director, designer and ad man. (Note: This applies to many forms of creativity but not necessarily to War and Peace.)

There’s one good reason why you want your unconscious involved. It processes data 500,000 times faster than your conscious mind.

From ‘Generating the Conditions for Creativity to Happen’, a recent article on www.thnk.org by creativity experts Neil Pavitt and Menno van Dijk

“Can’t focus? Maybe you’re a creative genius.

… scientists [have] found the first physiological evidence of a connection between creative thinking and sensory distractions…

… [they] found that poor ‘sensory gating’, the ability to filter unnecessary stimuli from the brain, correlated with a higher number of lifetime creative achievements.

Noise, in other words, aids inspiration.”

From a recent Washington Post article on new research at America’s Northwestern University, indicating the creative benefits of sensory distractions and having “leaky attention”

Every idea was O.K.  Steve Ross had a wonderful philosophy – that people got fired for NOT making mistakes.

Quoted in The New Yorker some years ago – a description of how Steven Ross, chairman of Warner Communications, encouraged wild ideas during MTV’s early years.

There is definitely something about paper that deepens focus. If I’m stuck trying to word something on my laptop I pick up a pen and notebook and instead try to do it in longhand. It usually works. Thoughts and ideas somehow seem to flow more freely than when you’re staring at a screen.

Carol Midgley, British journalist, in a recent article in The (London) Times,on how smart-phones make you stressed, stupid and less creative

Research has shown that a tired mind is often a more creative mind. It may sound counter-intuitive, but early birds should try solving problems late at night, while night owls should attempt to come up with solutions early in the morning.

From ‘Generating the Conditions for Creativity to Happen’, a recent article on www.thnk.org by creativity experts Neil Pavitt and Menno van Dijk